Soupe Improvisée au Boursin = Improvised Soup with Boursin

With very little time to prepare something warm, this little improvisation worked a treat.

As usual, a quick look in the fridge to check which vegetables were available set up this little soup.  I also used some carrots and celery I had cooked previously and topped the soup with a Boursin.

The contrast of the liquidised vegetables and the sliced carrots and celery was pleasant.

 

Serves 4:

2 leeks, rinsed and chopped

1 courgette, peeled and sliced

1 onion, peeled and quartered

2 garlic cloves, peeled and halved

1 vegetable stock cube

a little salt and pepper

1/2 garlic and herbs Boursin (you can also use a garlic and herbs Philadelphia)

  1. Put all the fresh vegetables and the stock cube in a pressure cooker with sufficient water to cover them and cook for a short time. Season with salt* and pepper.
  2. Whizz and reserve.
  3. Add the carrots and celery. Stir in the Boursin and serve immediately.

 

Bon Appétit!

Tip: * only use a little salt as the stock cube is already salted.

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Polenta and Cream of Courgettes

To answer the question of what to serve with lamb shanks cooked in red wine, a polenta came to mind.

It provided a quick and delicious accompaniment and I added some crème de courgettes. To complement the polenta, a generous topping of the cooking jus rounded the taste.

The polenta I use is a pre-cooked maize one and it is ready in a few minutes. You have to stir it constantly as it has a tendency to plop out of the saucepan if left unattended and it thickens very quickly. It sometimes looks like the lava of a volcano and it is certainly very hot!

The addition of the crème de courgettes gave a different flavour to it and incorporated the vegetables. The meat jus, essentially meat gravy with a strong red wine, was pleasing to the palate.

Serves 4 :

500ml salted water

3 tablespoons maize polenta

For the Cream of Courgettes:

2 medium-size courgettes, peeled and cut into chunks

1 onion, peeled and quartered

2 frozen cubes of garlic and parsley sauce

125ml single cream

  1. Cook the courgettes and onion in a pressure cooker and whizz.
  2. Add the cream and the garlic and parsley sauce.
  3. Bring the salted water to the boil and add the polenta, stirring all the time.
  4. When it is cooked (refer to the instructions on the packet for the cooking time), add the cream of courgettes and stir.
  5. Transfer into an oven-proof dish for 10 minutes at 180C.
  6. Just before serving, ladle some of the meat jus on top.

Bon Appétit!

Note:  I have mentioned before how to make garlic and parsley sauce, garlic and basil sauce and garlic and coriander sauce in convenient ice cube containers for some of the previous recipes. I will do a separate post to recap all that.

Or… see the post of Coquilles Saint Jacques à ma Façon (14 September 2015)

Simple Moussaka

This is a quick and healthy moussaka that can be made even if you have just come back from a walk in the country, as was the case this week.  Eating blackberries on the way helped, of course!

It is not the recipe for a traditional moussaka and I replaced the lamb with bacon and did not use any cooking fat.

Serves 4:

2 large aubergines

1 big onion, peeled and sliced

3 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced

2 small carrots, peeled

6 slices of back rashers smoked bacon

2 tablespoons grated parmesan

5 slices emmental cheese

A handful flat leaf parsley

1. Top and tail the aubergines and steam them in a pressure cooker, making sure they remain firm.

2. Meanwhile, whizz the bacon, onion, garlic, carrots and parsley and cook in a non-stick frying pan without any fat.

3. Slice the aubergines and place them in an oven-proof dish. Cover with a layer of the bacon mixture and sprinkle the parmesan on top.

4. Add another layer of aubergine slices and put the emmental slices on top. Put the dish in the oven at 180C for 20 minutes and serve with a green salad and a cool Pinot Grigio.

Bon Appétit!

Tip: I tend to make a larger quantity of the bacon mixture which freezes well and use it for pasta sauces or as filling for provençal vegetables.

Calamars à l’Armoricaine = Squid in Armoricaine Sauce

A family favourite and probably my signature dish, Squid in Armoricaine sauce are a little fiddly to prepare but worth the effort.

You can use either fresh squid or frozen, the taste is not altered. Moreover, this is a dish that freezes well and it comes in handy if you have a lazy day.

People are sometimes put off the idea of eating squid because they have only eaten rubbery rings, not sufficiently cooked. In this recipe, the squid are well cooked and tender and the sauce and flambé ensure that the taste is definitely present. The other misconception is that they could be as big as the deep sea monsters  featured in films. Not so, be reassured.

It is best to buy smallish squid but larger ones will mean less work for you at the preparation stage. If you like to cook en famille, young children will enjoy removing the transparent back bone (this, they can do by pulling it out, so do not need to use knives, which should be reserved for the adults cooks) and looking at the beautiful tentacles which resemble flowers. It is a good way to introduce children (but not infants) to tastier and varied dishes so they can educate their palate for adulthood.

My fishmonger sources them fresh from the coast or frozen from California, providing, as he says, that El Niño has not created a problem!

Serves 4:

1 kilo squid

1 large onion, peeled and finely sliced

4 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced

1 handful flat leaves parsley, finely chopped

2 small tins tomato purée

50g butter

2 tablespoons sunflower oil

100ml dry white wine

2 or 3 tablespoons Cognac

salt and pepper to season

  1. Warm up the oil in a big cast iron cocotte, if you have one, or in any cooking pot. Gently fry the onion and the garlic. Add the tomato purée with a volume of water identical to the volume of the tin. Stir and let it simmer gently. Add half the white wine.
  2. Rinse the squid in a colander. On a chopping board, slice them open, one by one. Chop off the head just below the eyes and under the tentacles. Remove a little white hard ball that is at the base of the head. Reserve the tentacles. Open up the body and remove the transparent backbone. Discard it (or keep it for birds). If there are eggs, remove them and discard. Slice the flesh into thin strips, approximately 1 cm wide. Keep the slices and the tentacles in a colander and rinse. There is sometimes a black ink which I do not keep, but some people do to make a sepia sauce.
  3. Pre-heat a metal frying pan which is not a non-stick one. Put half the squid and dry fry it until it turns light pink. Collect the cooking juices and pour them in the simmering tomato sauce. Continue cooking the squid and add 25g of butter, stir well.
  4. Pour 1 tablespoon Cognac on top and flambé. When the flames have died down, put the squid in the cooking pot and déglacé the frying pan with some of the remaining white wine. Add the juices to the sauce.
  5. Repeat the operation for the remainder of the squid.
  6. Simmer gently for 20 minutes and add the chopped parsley 2 minutes before serving.
  7. Finally, serve either on a bed of black spaghetti or on a bed of rice, with a good Chablis or any other dry white wine of your choice.

Bon Appétit!

Tip: Save the transparent back bone and let it dry. Small birds will enjoy eating it. They are the original cuttlefish bones.

The black spaghetti have been tinted with the squid ink and they give a pleasant visual contrast to the red sauce.

Veau aux Olives = Veal with Olives

Rosé veal is now easily available and for this warm Winter dish, chunks of meat are easy to cook. This dish freezes well, so it is worth to make a little more.

The best veal is reared in Corsica, where the cattle roam freely and are fed natural produce. It is a genuine organic meat, tender and full of flavour.

Beef can replace the veal, if you cannot find veal- or do not like it.

Serves 4:

500g rosé veal, cut into chunks

1 large onion, peeled and sliced

2 garlic cloves , peeled and sliced

1 dozen green olives, preferably pitted

200 ml strong red wine

1 small tin of tomato purée, diluted with same amount of water

1 tablespoon corn flour

1 tablespoon olive oil

salt and pepper

  1. Put the meat in a salad bowl and cover with the wine. Sprinkle a little pepper and salt (not too much salt as the olives are already salty). Leave in a cool place  for 1 hour but not in the fridge as it would harden the meat.
  2. Meanwhile, prepare the sauce: in a frying pan, warm up the olive oil and gently cook the onion and garlic, add the diluted tomato purée and simmer.
  3. Add the meat and the olives and cover with the wine marinade. Simmer for 15 minutes and thicken the sauce with the cornflour, stirring constantly to avoid lumps.

Serve with pasta and a good red Burgundy or a good red Patrimonio from Corsica.

Bon Appétit!

Loup en Aumônière = Parcel of Sea Bass

Fresh wild sea bass had arrived at the fishmonger’s and it was an invitation not to be refused.

As I do not like to de-gut and scale the fish, it was done nicely and promptly by the expert. You can, of course, do it yourself if you are keen. Otherwise, you can buy fillets of sea bass.

For the rest, I visited my favourite green grocer who is conveniently located next to the fishmonger’s.

On a cold day, the promise of an oven-cooked fresh fish is warming in itself and it does not take very long to prepare and cook it.

Moreover, from a dietitian’s point of view, apart from the tomato oil which is olive oil, this is a typical Mediterranean diet dish, to be enjoyed without worries for your arteries or waist line.

Serves 2 or 4 (depending on your appetite):

2 medium-sized fresh sea bass, cut open in half, like a book

4 sun-dried tomatoes in oil, cut in small pieces

4 large garlic cloves, peeled and sliced

4 small branches of fresh fennel bulbs, finely sliced

coarse sea salt and pepper

2 tablespoon oil from the sun-dried tomatoes jar

juice of 1 lemon to serve

  1. Rinse the fish in cold water and place in an ovenproof dish, opening them like a book.
  2. Sprinkle a little salt and pepper on the inside of the fish and add the tomato pieces, the fennel slices and the garlic. Sprinkle a few drops of the tomato oil.
  3. Close both fish, sprinkle a little more salt on top and drizzle the remainder of the tomato oil.
  4. Cover the dish with foil and cook in the oven at 200C for 30 minutes.

 

Serve with small steamed potatoes and a cool Chardonnay from Bourgogne.

Bon Appétit!

Note:  I forgot to take a picture before eating the sea bass, so the only one is of the dish before it went in the oven 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pain Perdu à la Tomate = De-Structured Pizza

Pain Perdu in French is a pudding similar to Spotted Dick and is a way to transform stale bread into something edible.
The alternative is to feed it to the ducks.

This time, the ducks will have to rely on someone else to provide their meal and yesterday’s baguette will become a savoury dish, using freshly made tomato sauce ( see previous post on Velouté de Tomate of 5 August 2014).

In Italy, this sauce is a passata, so called because it is put through a sieve to remove the seeds.

This de-structured pizza may not appeal to the genuine pizza lovers but it is easy to prepare and will be very tasty when you garnish it with parmesan shavings. You can, of course, add a few black olives, some anchovies and capers, depending on taste.
The texture will be very different from a traditional thin based, oven-baked pizza in that it will be soft – but it is worth trying.

If you do not want to make the tomato sauce from fresh tomatoes, tinned ones will be fine, providing you simmer them for long enough or the sauce will be watery.

Serves 4:

1 baguette or 4 thick slices of country bread or any other bread
Parmesan shavings
Fresh basil leaves

For the sauce:
1kg fresh tomatoes, rinsed and quartered
1 onion, peeled and quartered
1 garlic head, cloves peeled
Olive oil
Salt and pepper to season

1. Cut the bread in thick slices, toast it and rub it with peeled fresh garlic cloves.
Place it in a cooking pot containing the tomato sauce and simmer until most of the sauce has been absorbed by the bread.

2. Add a few leaves of fresh basil, drizzle with a little olive oil, sprinkle with parmesan shavings and serve immediately.

Bon Appétit!

Tip:
Try using chilli infused olive oil, sparingly if you do not like chillies too much.